My Graduate Project Render Exhibiting at the base of the Walkie Talkie Building 
 

Exhibited by UAL: Chelsea College of Arts  / 3 August 2021

Exhibition at the Walkie Talkie Building



'The Wood City' graduation project I created in UAL: Chelsea College  was selected to showcase, on a giant hoarding at the base of the Walkie Talkie building. My project is currently on display and will be on till October 2021. 

Tune in to see one of the main renders created for my project, live in the base of the famous Walkie Talkie building. 



Address: 20 Fenchurch St, London EC3M 8AF, United Kingdom 

Graduate Project Exhibiting in London Streets
Graduate Project Exhibiting in London Streets

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Graduate Project Exhibiting in London Streets
Graduate Project Exhibiting in London Streets

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By Susie Mesure  / 12 October 2020

My Interview with the Telegraph Newspaper 
 

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The Sunny Art Centre art course for children CREDIT:  Roman Penderev

How to raise an alpha kid: the super - rich parent's guide to painting and drawing 

"Art isn't just a hobby - it brings cognitive benefits, and a bulging portfolio could gain your child entry to a top school or college". 
 

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Where are the best places to study?

 

One of the main advantages with art is it’s something that can be done anywhere, even at home over Zoom. Many of Marshall’s clients live overseas. “I do video chats, demonstrate on screen and they send me images of their work,” he says. Mina Dagbasi, 21, who is studying Interior Design at Chelsea College of Art, was based in Turkey when she started working with Marshall four years ago. With his support, she got onto a foundation course at Central Saint Martins. She loves the breadth of the discipline. “You don’t even have to be perfect at drawing. It’s about what you think that nobody else thinks that matters,” she says.

 

For tuition from some of the world’s best teachers, a specialist art institution such as the Sunny Art Centre, in central London, is a good bet. Its art tutors come from London’s Royal Academy, the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and Athen’s Academy of Art. Groups are limited to ten children maximum , although there are also live online courses because of Covid-19, says headteacher Yinjie Sun. “Studying the fine arts will encourage children to think outside of the box and hone their problem-solving skills by encouraging them to find new and creative ways to solve issues at hand.”

What’s the best age to get serious?

“I’d love to say as young as possible. I wish more art took place in primary schools, just so people see it as something that can seriously enhance [children’s] educational experience and enjoyment,” says Knight. For Yinjie, it’s important that it’s the kids deciding to take his courses, rather than their parents deciding for them. He agrees with the younger the better, partly because drawing can give children a different way to express themselves when they are young. “Plus, studying drawing will help kids understand how to self-discipline themselves,” he adds.  

What do the former child prodigies say now? 

 

“For me, the best feeling is finishing a piece so people can see what I was thinking about. I hope to start my own interior design company,” says Dagbasi. 

Subscribe to The Telegraph Newsletter to read online in their site: 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/luxury/kids/raise-alpha-kid-super-rich-parents-guide-painting-drawing/